Something about us

About Us

20150316_104417

John Doppenberg and Dave Kyle began growing garlic and other vegetables in 2009 on John's 20 acre farm on Gladwin Road in Abbotsford.

John's farm is blessed with black Fraser Valley River loam topsoil that is meters deep. From the beginning we wanted to build a in-house garlic stock from bulbils.

We started from a few dozen hardnecks but now we have 12,000 plants in the ground.

Sustainability

20150316_104455

We only use sustainable farming methods, with absolutely no chemicals or hormones of any kind.  Our hope is to build our garlic stock even more for 2016 but we do have several hundred pounds of garlic available for sale this summer along with Swedish potatoes, Jubilee Corn, Walla Walla & Spanish onions and a few other veggies.

More Information

20140901_180604

Browse our site and keep checking back as we will be adding pictures and text through the year so you can follow the plants as we move to harvest season.  Enjoy our site and we hope to see you soon as customers.

Latest blog posts

Garlic half-Grown by February

20150215_121322By early February our purples were over a foot high with six leaves showing.  Fully extended some were nearly 16 inches long.  The Porcelains in the distance were planted 2 weeks later and are lagging behind a bit in size.  We expect the Purples to be ready for harvest by early June.  Last year we had some for sale at the Berry Festival in early July.  I suspect we will be selling this year’s crop at the Festival in Abbotsford again.

We planted the purples in mid October and to date we have had over 750 mill (over 31 inches) of rain! The constant pounding will actually flatten these beds considerably.  But, drainage has been good with only half a dozen plants ever standing in water.  Naturally, they are already smaller than their neighbours and will amount to little by harvest time.  Growing garlic in Zone 8, particularly the lower mainland of B.C or up the Fraser Valley requires some planning.

Published: February 15, 2015 | Comments: 0

Garlic Half Grown by February

20150215_121322

By mid February the purple stripe is over a foot tall with 5-6 leaves showing.  The darker porcelains in the distance are a few inches shorter with fewer leaves showing.

Published: February 7, 2015 | Comments: 0

Compost mulch on garlic

20141117_07495220141117_075015

We put a half-inch layer of fresh compost from Net Zero (they lease space on John’s farm) shortly after planting.  These are the porcelain beds on a frosty December morning. The warm compost created a steam cloud on the frozen soil.  The compost is weed free and lasts several months before the wind and rain wash it away of break it down.

We add another layer in late March to early April as the last feeding before the plants start forming scapes in May.  We use compost as a mulch and a food source and it does help hold some weeds down.

Compost mulch also improves the tilth or composition of the soil and helps break down clay patches.  This soil is  like chocolate cake to work in.  It crumbles easily, the worm feed on the compost and stay inside the raised beds adding their natural fertilizer to the soil.

Compost (or any similar mulch) makes weeding and harvesting much easier as well.

In our wet Zone 8 climate it is vital to plant your garlic in raised beds. Garlic is sensitive to having their roots in water so your soil must drain well.  Sandy soil is fine but is lacks organics and without compost or other natural fertilizers the garlic size will suffer.

Our soil is black loam with some clay in patches.  Field drainage is crucial and raised beds keep our plants out of sitting water.  Even a few days of saturated soil will reduce your garlic harvest.

Published: December 7, 2014 | Comments: 0

Weed Suppression Trial

20141214_12421020141128_110404

 

Here are two short test beds where we used different grades of craft paper as weed blocks.  Both beds have compost as a mulch cover.  You can see the finished product on the left side of the brown paper bed.

The white paper lasted longer and we had only a fraction of the weeds seen in all the other beds,  The brown craft paper broke down a little faster than the white and the weeds came through a little more but both attempts worked well.

We simple planted through the compost and paper in our regular planting pattern of about 8 inches of space in all directions.

 

Published: December 7, 2014 | Comments: 0

Porcelain Fall planting

20141214_122608

November 2014 we began planting over 8,000 Porcelain hardnecks in raised beds.  Notice how tall the purple stripes are that were planted three weeks earlier on the right.  They are already showing 3-4 leaves!  It was a very mild fall.

We have learned raised beds are mandatory if you want to grow large garlic in our wet climate.

Published: November 7, 2014 | Comments: 0

Purple Stripe Planting Oct. 2014

20141128_112334

Oct 15-18 we planted 2,500 purple stripe hardnecks.  Here is a raised bed already amended with compost and worm-castings.  The plants are generously spaced about 8″ apart each way allowing for easy access with a dutch hoe once the weeds start in the spring.

Published: October 15, 2014 | Comments: 0